Garnacha: A New Experience

I moved to a new desk at work. I sit in a new area with a different group of coworkers. It’s incredible how a small change in location can improve one’s perspective. My routine has been disrupted, I walk to somewhere new, I set my bag down in a different place. My desk is arranged differently. All of these small changes have forced me to be more aware of my surroundings, and more present. I was in a rut, and I didn’t even realize it. I’ve found myself sitting taller. I’m taking more time to breathe and enjoy my new view of the skyline. None of this would have even occurred to me had I not been asked to sit somewhere new.

This new point of view really got me thinking. What other aspects of life are we perpetually stuck in, solely because they are routine and comfortable? Like a lot of wine drinkers, I know what I like. When I want a glass of wine, I don’t want to guess wrong, I just want something I know will be enjoyable. What happens if I don’t like the wine? I don’t want to waste my money, so I’ll probably drink it anyways, but forcing yourself to finish a glass sort of defeats the whole purpose of drinking wine in the first place. I should just buy that same bottle I usually do, right? Wrong. Well, sort of wrong. Of course there are times when you’ve had a long day and you need that perfect glass of red you’ve been craving all week. Respect, you do you. But, sometimes you just have to take a leap of faith to get yourself out of the rut you didn’t even know you were in. (If you only drink Pinot Noir, then I’m definitely talking to you.)

Inspired by my forced change in perspective, I’m drinking something different – Garnacha. This is a wine I probably would never have grabbed from my local shop. Why? Because I have no idea what it is. The unknown is terrifying. That’s why I, ahem… I mean children, are afraid of the dark. You don’t know what’s out there. It could be anything. That’s scary. And so is this wine.  But trying new things helps you grow. Growth is good and, turns out, so is Garnacha.

Garnacha is the Spanish name for the French grape, Grenache. This grape is well known for its use in the GSM Blends of the Rhone Valley and is also growing in popularity thanks to the prominence of Châteauneuf-du-Pape. The less famous Garnacha is grown in the Aragón region of Spain, just two hundred kilometers west of Barcelona. This grape thrives in the long, hot growing season of the region. The extended growing season concentrates its flavor and increases the alcohol content. To describe Garnacha in the least pretentious way possible, this wine is super drinkable. It smells like sweet strawberries and cherries, but tastes a bit drier than than the sweetness on the nose had lead me to expect. On the palate I got black cherry and hints of earth and smoke. This wine is also easy, as it’s acidity, tannins and full body make it perfect for pairing with a huge variety of foods. Tapas anyone?

Trying a new wine can be intimidating. Heck, I’m still nervous that I’m going to look silly ordering from a wine list, and I work for a wine company. Don’t stress about it. Get out of your wine rut.  Try something new. I’m always down for the excitement of trusting your gut and simply grabbing a bottle. However, if that feels like throwing your money away, don’t be shy to talk to your local wine shop clerk or do some quick google fu before making your purchase. Better yet, reach out to us, at From the Cellar. Our mission is to help educate people about wine and make it less intimidating to try new bottles. Let us know what you like and we’ll gladly give you a suggestion of something different and interesting to experience. Cheers!

Sources:

  1. http://www.lasrocaswine.com/our-wines/garnacha-grenache.asp
  2. https://www.forbes.com/sites/nickpassmore/2015/09/18/garnacha-the-best-wine-youve-never-heard-of/#b34ee7674ed5

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Bright Cellars

Our staff is full of winos with a passion for vino. With our amazing wine director at the helm, we’ve been schooled on all things wine. We came together to write this article, in hopes of spreading a little wine-ducation with you.

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